I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area

I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area

I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area friendly, atheistic,

hard-working, beer-drinking lot whose mindsare preoccupied with sex, chess

and baseball when they arenot preoccupied with science.

I was a very good student, if I may say so myself. I wastops at St. Michael’s

College four years in a row. I got everypossible student award from the Department

of Zoology. If Igot none from the Department of Religious Studies, it is simplybecause

there are no student awards in this department (therewards of religious study

 

are not in mortal hands, we allknow that). I would have received the Governor

“You are not so fed up on Mrs. Pollzoff that you want to

get away from us all, are you?” he demanded.

 

“No, of course not, but I was wondering what his plan was and what

happened to it, if anything,” Roberta answered.

 

“Glad to hear you do not want to leave. Gosh, to lose our only girl sky-pilot

would be—unthinkable; but, come to think of it, Howe came to the house to see

Dad one day last week, perhaps they are getting it fixed up for you to take on

 

the job. I heard the Old Man say the Federal representative would be at the

office today, so perhaps you’ll get some information. Here we are.” They reached

the plane and Roberta climbed into the seat beside the pilot’s, adjusted straps

 

and parachute, while the young man gave his machine15 a thorough looking-

“Yes, and here I am,” Mr. Howe announced himself as he entered. “They told me

you were all in here, so I took the liberty of coming in without knocking;

I can go out the same way if you like.”

 

“You can stay here, without knocking,” Mr. Trowbridge hastened

to assure him. “I’m thinking Miss Langwell is glad to see you.”

“She has been handling a job that is dull as ditch-water,” Wallace put in quickly.

 

over then took

his own place.

“Any idea what

it’s all about?”

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Wen Chou’s soldiers approached under cover. As they drew near

Wen Chou’s soldiers approached under cover. As they drew near

Wen Chou’s soldiers approached under cover. As they drew near, the officers told Cao Cao, saying, “The rebels are near. We ought to catch the horses and go back to Baima.”

But Adviser Xun You checked them, saying, “These are a bait for the enemy. Why retire?”

  Cao Cao glanced across at him and said, “He understands. Do not say anything.”

  Now having got possession of the supply carts, the enemy next came to seize the horses. By this time they had all broken ranks and were scattered, each soldier going his own way. Then suddenly Cao Cao gave the order to go down from the mounds and smite them.

  the surprise was complete. Wen Chou’s army was in confusion, and Cao Cao’s army surrounded them. Wen Chou made a stand, but those about him trampled each other down, and he could do nothing but flee. And he fled.

  then standing on the top of a mound Cao Cao pointed to the flying leader, calling out, “There is one of the most famous generals of the north. Who can capture him?”

  Zhang Liao and Xu Huang both mounted and dashed after him, crying, “Wen Chou, do not run away!”

  Looking round, the fugitive saw two pursuers, and then he set aside his spear, took his bow and adjusted an arrow, which he shot at Zhang Liao.

  “Cease shooting, you rebel!” shouted Xu Huang.

  Zhang Liao ducked his head, and the shaft went harmlessly by, save that it carried away the tassel of his cap. He only pressed harder in pursuit. The next arrow however struck his horse in the head, and the animal stumbled and fell, throwing its rider to the earth.

  then Wen Chou turned to come back. Xu Huang, whirling his battle-ax, stood in his way to stop Wen Chou. But Xu Huang saw behind Wen Chou several more horsemen coming to help; and as they would have been too many for him, he fled. Wen Chou pursued along the river bank. Suddenly he saw coming toward him with banners fluttering in the breeze, a small party of horse, and the leader carried a GREat sword.

“Stop!” cried Guan Yu, for it was he, and he attacked at once.

  At the third bout Wen Chou’s heart failed him, and he wheeled and fled, following the windings of the river. But Guan Yu’s steed was fast and soon caught up. One blow, and the hapless Wen Chou fell.

  When Cao Cao saw from the mound that the leader of the enemy had fallen, he gave the signal for a general onset, and half of the northern army were drowned in the river. And the carts with supplies and all the horses were quickly recovered.

Now Guan Yu, at the head of a few horsemen, was thrusting here and striking there at the moment when Liu Bei, with the thirty thousand reserve troops, appeared on the battle field on the other bank of the river. At once they told him that the red-faced, long-bearded warrior was there and had slain Wen Chou. Liu Bei hastily

pressed forward to try to get a

look at the warrior. He saw across the river a

body of horse and the banners

bore the words Guan Yu, Lord of Hanshou.

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Precisely by being so slow. Sleepiness and sloth-fulness keepit out

Precisely by being so slow. Sleepiness and sloth-fulness keepit out

Precisely by being so slow. Sleepiness and sloth-fulness keepit out of harm’s way,

away from the notice of jaguars, ocelots,harpy eagles and anacondas. A sloth’s

hairs shelter an algaethat is brown during the dry season and green during the

wetseason, so the animal blends in with the surrounding moss andfoliage and

 

looks like a nest of white ants or of squirrels, orlike nothing at all but part of a tree.
The three-toed sloth lives a peaceful, vegetarian life in perfectharmony with its

environment. “A good-natured smile is foreveron its lips,” reported Tirler (1966).

 

I have seen that smile withmy own eyes. I am not one given to projecting human

traitsand emotions onto animals, but many a time during thatmonth in Brazil,

looking up at sloths in repose, I felt I was inthe presence of upside-down yogis

 

deep in meditation orhermits deep in prayer, wise beings whose intense

imaginativelives were beyond the reach of my scientific probing.

Sometimes I got my majors mixed up. A number of myfellow religious-studies

students – muddled agnostics who didn’tknow which way was up, who were

in the thrall of reason,that fool’s gold for the bright – reminded me of the

 

three-toedsloth; and the three-toed sloth, such a beautiful example of

themiracle of life, reminded me of God.

“Or rides the air,” Harvey laughed.

 

“Are you children riding in with me?” Mr. Langwell asked.

“The time is getting short.”

 

“I am, Dad, thanks. If you will take me as far as the subway in

Jamaica, I’ll land just in time for class,” Harvey answered.

“Phil will be here to pick me up, thank you,” Roberta replied, so,

 

as the meal was finished, and the last pancake had disappeared,

they left the table to start on the day’s occupations. Harvey raced

up the stairs, three at a jump, while his sister gave her mother a

 

hand straightening the dining room as she waited for

Phil Fisher to take her to the flying field.

“I hear the motor, my dear,” Mrs. Langwell interrupted.

“You’d better hurry.”

 

13 “He’s early this morning, but probably he has something to do

before schedule.” The girl hastened with her own preparations so

that when the young man appeared at the

 

door she was

properly helmeted

and all ready

to take the air.

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Very few other companies or corporate leaders—perhaps none

Very few other companies or corporate leaders—perhaps none

Very few other companies or corporate leaders—perhaps none—could have

gotten away with the brilliant audacity of associating their brand with Gandhi,

Einstein, Picasso, and the Dalai Lama. Jobs was able to encourage people to

 

define themselves as anticorporate, creative, innovative rebels simply by the

computer they used. “Steve created the only lifestyle brand in the tech industry,”

Larry Ellison said. “There are cars people are proud to have—Porsche, Ferrari,

 

Prius—because what I drive says something about me. People feel

the same way about an Apple product.”

Starting with the “Think Different” campaign, and continuing through the rest

of his years at Apple, Jobs held a freewheeling three-hour meeting every

 

Wednesday afternoon with his top agency, marketing, and communications

people to kick around messaging strategy. “There’s not a CEO on the planet

who deals with marketing the way Steve does,” said Clow. “Every Wednesday he

 

approves each new commercial, print ad, and billboard.” At the end of the

meeting, he would often take Clow and his two agency colleagues, Duncan

Milner and James Vincent, to Apple’s closely guarded design studio to see

 

what products were in the works. “He gets very passionate and emotional

when he shows us what’s in development,” said Vincent. By sharing with his

marketing gurus his passion for the products as they were being created,

 

he was able to ensure that almost every ad they produced was infused with his emotion.

iCEO

As he was finishing work on the “Think Different” ad, Jobs did some different

thinking of his own. He decided that he would officially take over running the

 

company, at least on a temporary basis. He had been the de facto leader since

Amelio’s ouster ten weeks earlier, but only as an advisor. Fred Anderson had the

titular role of interim CEO. On September 16, 1997, Jobs announced that he would

 

take over that title, which inevitably got abbreviated as iCEO. His commitment was

tentative: He took no salary and signed no contract. But he was not tentative

 

in his actions.

He was in charge,

and he did not

rule by consensus.

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In addition to the television commercials, they created one

In addition to the television commercials, they created one

In addition to the television commercials, they created one of the most

memorable print campaigns in history. Each ad featured a black-and-white

portrait of an iconic historical figure with just the Apple logo and the words

 

“Think Different” in the corner. Making it particularly engaging was that

the faces were not captioned. Some of them—Einstein, Gandhi, Lennon,

Dylan, Picasso, Edison, Chaplin, King—were easy to identify. But others

 

caused people to pause, puzzle, and maybe ask a friend to put a name to

the face: Martha Graham, Ansel Adams, Richard Feynman,

Maria Callas, Frank Lloyd Wright, James Watson, Amelia Earhart.

 

Most were Jobs’s personal heroes. They tended to be creative people who

had taken risks, defied failure, and bet their career on doing things in a

different way. A photography buff, he became involved in making sure they

 

had the perfect iconic portraits. “This is not the right picture of Gandhi,” he

erupted to Clow at one point. Clow explained that the famous Margaret

Bourke-White photograph of Gandhi at the spinning wheel was owned by

 

Time-Life Pictures and was not available for commercial use. So Jobs called

Norman Pearlstine, the editor in chief of Time Inc., and badgered him into

making an exception. He called Eunice Shriver to convince her family to

 

release a picture that he loved, of her brother Bobby Kennedy touring

Appalachia, and he talked to Jim Henson’s children personally

to get the right shot of the late Muppeteer.

 

He likewise called Yoko Ono for a picture of her late husband, John Lennon.

She sent him one, but it was not Jobs’s favorite. “Before it ran, I was in New

York, and I went to this small Japanese restaurant that I love, and let her

 

know I would be there,” he recalled. When he arrived, she came over to his

table. “This is a better one,” she said, handing him an envelope. “I thought

I would see you, so I had this with me.” It was the classic photo of her and

John in bed together, holding flowers, and it was the one that

 

Apple ended up using. “

I can see why John

fell in love with her,”

Jobs recalled.

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“I didn’t get any sleep last night,” Jobs replied.“Why? What’s the

“I didn’t get any sleep last night,” Jobs replied.“Why? What’s the

“I didn’t get any sleep last night,” Jobs replied.“Why? What’s the problem?”

“I was thinking about all the things that need to be done and about the deal

we’re making, and it’s all running together for me. I’m really tired now

and not thinking clearly. I just don’t want to be asked any more questions.”

 

Amelio said that wasn’t possible. He needed to say something.

Finally Jobs answered, “Look, if you have to tell them something, just say

advisor to the chairman.” And that is what Amelio did.

 

The announcement was made that evening—December 20, 1996—in front of 250

cheering employees at Apple headquarters. Amelio did as Jobs had requested and

described his new role as merely that of a part-time advisor. Instead of appearing

 

from the wings of the stage, Jobs walked in from the rear of the auditorium and

ambled down the aisle. Amelio had told the gathering that Jobs would be too tired

to say anything, but by then he had been energized by the applause. “I’m very excited,”

Jobs said. “I’m looking forward to get to reknow some old colleagues.” Louise Kehoe

 

of the Financial Times came up to the stage afterward and asked Jobs, sounding almost

accusatory, whether he was going to end up taking over Apple. “Oh no, Louise,” he said.

“There are a lot of other things going on in my life now. I have a family. I am involved

at Pixar. My time is limited, but I hope I can share some ideas.”

 

The next day Jobs drove to Pixar. He had fallen increasingly in love with the place, and

he wanted to let the crew there know he was still going to be president and deeply

involved. But the Pixar people were happy to see him go back to Apple part-time; a

 

little less of Jobs’s focus would be a good thing. He was useful when there were big

negotiations, but he could be dangerous when he had too much time on his hands.

When he arrived at Pixar that day, he went to Lasseter’s office and explained that

 

even just being an advisor at Apple would take up a lot of his time. He said he wanted

Lasseter’s blessing. “I keep thinking about all the time away from my family this will

cause, and the time away from the other family at Pixar,” Jobs said. “But the only reason

 

I want to do it is

that the world will

be a better place

with Apple in it.”

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After a few minutes of pleasantries—far more than Jobs

After a few minutes of pleasantries—far more than Jobs

After a few minutes of pleasantries—far more than Jobs usually engaged

in—he abruptly announced the reason for his visit. He wanted Amelio to

help him return to Apple as the CEO. “There’s only one person who can rally

 

the Apple troops,” Jobs said, “only one person who can straighten out the

company.” The Macintosh era had passed, Jobs argued, and it was now time for

Apple to create something new that was just as innovative.

 

“If the Mac is dead, what’s going to replace it?” Amelio asked. Jobs’s reply didn’t

impress him. “Steve didn’t seem to have a clear answer,” Amelio later said.

“He seemed to have a set of one-liners.” Amelio felt he was witnessing Jobs’s

 

reality distortion field and was proud to be immune to it. He shooed

Jobs unceremoniously out of his office.

By the summer of 1996 Amelio realized that he had a serious problem. Apple was

 

pinning its hopes on creating a new operating system, called Copland, but Amelio

had discovered soon after becoming CEO that it was a bloated piece of vaporware

that would not solve Apple’s needs for better networking and memory protection,

 

nor would it be ready to ship as scheduled in 1997. He publicly promised that

he would quickly find an alternative. His problem was that he didn’t have one.

So Apple needed a partner, one that could make a stable operating system,

 

preferably one that was UNIX-like and had an object-oriented application layer.

There was one company that could obviously supply such software—

NeXT—but it would take a while for Apple to focus on it.

 

Apple first homed in on a company that had been started by Jean-Louis Gassée, called

Be. Gassée began negotiating the sale of Be to Apple, but in August 1996 he overplayed

his hand at a meeting with Amelio in Hawaii. He said he wanted to bring his fifty-person

 

team to Apple, and he asked for 15% of the company, worth about $500 million. Amelio

was stunned. Apple calculated that Be was worth about $50 million. After a few offers and

counteroffers, Gassée refused to budge from demanding at least $275 million. He thought that

Apple had no alternatives. It got back to Amelio that Gassée said, “I’ve got them

 

by the balls, and

I’m going to squeeze

until it hurts.” This did

not please Amelio.

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That night Jobs took his Macintosh team out to dinner at

That night Jobs took his Macintosh team out to dinner at

That night Jobs took his Macintosh team out to dinner at Nina’s Café in

Woodside. Jean-Louis Gassée was in town because Sculley wanted him

to prepare to take over the Macintosh division, and Jobs invited him to

 

join them. Belleville proposed a toast “to those of us who really understand

what the world according to Steve Jobs is all about.” That phrase—“the world

according to Steve”—had been used dismissively by others at Apple who

belittled the reality warp he created. After the others left, Belleville sat with

Jobs in his Mercedes and urged him to

organize a battle to the death with Sculley.

Months earlier, Apple had gotten the right to export computers to China,

and Jobs had been invited to sign a deal in the Great Hall of the People over

the 1985 Memorial Day weekend. He had told Sculley, who decided he wanted

to go himself, which was just fine with Jobs. Jobs decided to use Sculley’s absence

to execute his coup. Throughout the week leading up to Memorial Day,

he took a lot of people on walks to share his plans. “I’m going to launch a

coup while John is in China,” he told Mike Murray.

Seven Days in May

Thursday, May 23: At his regular Thursday meeting with his top lieutenants

in the Macintosh division, Jobs told his inner circle about his plan to oust Sculley.

He also confided in the corporate human resources director, Jay Elliot, who

told him bluntly that the proposed rebellion wouldn’t work. Elliot had talked

to some board members and urged them to stand up for Jobs, but he

discovered that most of the board was with Sculley, as were most members of

Apple’s senior staff. Yet Jobs barreled ahead. He even revealed his plans to

Gassée on a walk around the parking lot, despite the fact that Gassée had come from

 

Paris to take his job.

“I made the mistake of telling

Gassée,” Jobs wryly

conceded years later.

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“When you throw stones at a rat, beware of the vase

“When you throw stones at a rat, beware of the vase

Guan Yu was still angry of the Prime Minister’s breach of decorum.

One day Guan Yu said to Liu Bei, “Brother, why did you prevent me from killing that rebel and so ridding the world of a scoundrel? He insults the Emperor and ignores everybody else.”

  “When you throw stones at a rat, beware of the vase,” quoted Liu Bei. “Cao Cao was only a horse’s head away from Our Lord, and in the midst of a crowd of his partisans. In that momentary burst of anger, if you had struck and failed, and harm had come to the Emperor, what an awful crime would have been laid to us!”

  “If we do not rid the world of him today, a worse evil will come of it,” said Guan Yu.

  “But be discreet, my brother. Such matters cannot be lightly discussed.”

  the Emperor sadly returned to his palace. With tears in his eyes, he related what had occurred in the hunt to his consort, Empress Fu.

  “Alas for me!” said he. “From the first days of my accession, one vicious minister has succeeded another. I was the victim of Dong Zhuo’s evil machinations. Then followed the rebellion of Li Jue and Guo Si. You and I had to bear sorrows such as no others have borne. Then came this Cao Cao as one who would maintain the imperial dignity, but he has seized upon all real authority and does as he wishes. He works continually for his own glorification, and I never see him but my back pricks. These last few days in the hunting field, he went in front of me and acknowledged the cheers of the crowd. He is so extremely rude that I feel sure he has sinister designs against me. Alas, my wife, we know not when our end may come!”

  “In a whole court full of nobles, who have eaten the bread of Han, is there not one who will save his country?” said she.

  Thus spoke the Empress, and at the same moment there stepped in a man who said, “Grieve not, O Imperial Pair! I can find a savior for the country.”

It was none other than the father of the Empress, Fu Wan.

“Have you heard of Cao Cao’s

wanton and perverse behavior?”

said the Emperor, drying his eyes.

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The entire information age? Was George Orwell right about 1984?”

The entire information age? Was George Orwell right about 1984?”

The entire information age? Was George Orwell right about 1984?” At that moment a screen

came down from the ceiling and showed a preview of an upcoming sixty-second television ad for

the Macintosh. In a few months it was destined to make advertising history, but in the meantime

it served its purpose of rallying Apple’s demoralized sales force. Jobs had always been able to draw

energy by imagining himself as a rebel pitted against the forces of darkness. Now he was

able to energize his troops with the same vision.

 

Jobs was at the Grand Hyatt in Manhattan, preparing for the press previews, so a Sunday morning

conference call was scheduled. The software manager calmly explained the situation to Jobs, while

Hertzfeld and the others huddled around the speakerphone holding their breath. All they needed

was an extra two weeks. The initial shipments to the dealers could have a version of the software

labeled “demo,” and these could be replaced as soon as the new code was finished at the end of

the month. There was a pause. Jobs did not get angry; instead he spoke in cold, somber tones. He

told them they were really great. So great, in fact, that he knew they could get this done. “There’s

no way we’re slipping!” he declared. There was a collective gasp in the Bandley building work space.

“You guys have been working on this stuff for months now, another couple weeks isn’t going to make

that much of a difference. You may as well get it over with. I’m going to ship the code a week from

Monday, with your names on it.”

“Well, we’ve got to finish it,” Steve Capps said. And so they did. Once again, Jobs’s reality distortion

field pushed them to do what they had thought impossible. On Friday Randy Wigginton brought in a

huge bag of chocolate-covered espresso beans for the final three all-nighters. When Jobs arrived at

work at 8:30 a.m. that Monday, he found Hertzfeld sprawled nearly comatose on the couch. They talked

for a few minutes about a remaining tiny glitch, and Jobs decreed that it wasn’t a problem. Hertzfeld

dragged himself to his blue Volkswagen Rabbit (license plate: MACWIZ) and drove home to bed.

A short while later Apple’s Fremont factory began to roll out boxes emblazoned with the colorful line

 

drawings of the Macintosh.

Real artists ship, Jobs had

declared, and now the

Macintosh team had.

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