I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area

I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area

I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area friendly, atheistic,

hard-working, beer-drinking lot whose mindsare preoccupied with sex, chess

and baseball when they arenot preoccupied with science.

I was a very good student, if I may say so myself. I wastops at St. Michael’s

College four years in a row. I got everypossible student award from the Department

of Zoology. If Igot none from the Department of Religious Studies, it is simplybecause

there are no student awards in this department (therewards of religious study

 

are not in mortal hands, we allknow that). I would have received the Governor

“You are not so fed up on Mrs. Pollzoff that you want to

get away from us all, are you?” he demanded.

 

“No, of course not, but I was wondering what his plan was and what

happened to it, if anything,” Roberta answered.

 

“Glad to hear you do not want to leave. Gosh, to lose our only girl sky-pilot

would be—unthinkable; but, come to think of it, Howe came to the house to see

Dad one day last week, perhaps they are getting it fixed up for you to take on

 

the job. I heard the Old Man say the Federal representative would be at the

office today, so perhaps you’ll get some information. Here we are.” They reached

the plane and Roberta climbed into the seat beside the pilot’s, adjusted straps

 

and parachute, while the young man gave his machine15 a thorough looking-

“Yes, and here I am,” Mr. Howe announced himself as he entered. “They told me

you were all in here, so I took the liberty of coming in without knocking;

I can go out the same way if you like.”

 

“You can stay here, without knocking,” Mr. Trowbridge hastened

to assure him. “I’m thinking Miss Langwell is glad to see you.”

“She has been handling a job that is dull as ditch-water,” Wallace put in quickly.

 

over then took

his own place.

“Any idea what

it’s all about?”

www.shlfccc.com

General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s

General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s

General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s highestundergraduate award,

of which no small number of illustriousCanadians have been recipients, were it not

for a beef-eatingpink boy with a neck like a tree trunk and a

temperament ofunbearable good cheer.

I still smart a little at the slight. When you’ve suffered agreat deal in life, each

additional pain is both unbearable andtrifling. My life is like a memento mori

painting from Europeanart: there is always a grinning skull at my side to remind

meof the folly of human ambition. I mock this skull. I look at itand I say,

 

“You’ve got the wrong fellow. You may not believein life, but I don’t believe

in death. Move on!” The skullsnickers and moves ever closer,

but that doesn’t surprise me.shlf1314

The reason death sticks so closely to life isn’t biologicalnecessity – it’s envy. Life is

so beautiful that death has fallen inlove with it, a jealous,

possessive love that grabs at what it can.shlf1314

But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two ofno importance,

and gloom is but the passing shadow of acloud. The pink boy also got the

nod from the RhodesScholarship committee. I love him and I hope his time

 

atOxford was a rich experience. If Lakshmi, goddess of wealth,one day

favours me bountifully, Oxford is fifth on the list ofcities I would like to

visit before I pass on, after Mecca,Varanasi, Jerusalem and Paris.shlf1314

I have nothing to say of my working life, only that a tie is anoose, and

inverted though it is, it will hang a man nonethelessif he’s not careful.

 

“It isn’t much of a hop, and as Mrs. Pollzoff has all the earmarks of being a

good customer, she must be humored,” Phil grinned. “Just the same, I’m

 

glad they wished her on you and Nike instead of the Moth and yours truly.”

“Well, it’s no particular fun piloting her. I wish she’d decide she wants variety,

 

and14 give you all a chance at the job,” Roberta told him. They were making

their way to where the Moth, Phil’s own imported machine, waited to leap

in the air with them. “I say, when is Mr. Howe going to start shlf1314

 

that investigation

he spoke of a few

weeks ago. Heard

anything about it?”

shlfbbb.com

I love Canada. I miss the heat of India, the food, the houselizards

I love Canada. I miss the heat of India, the food, the houselizards

I love Canada. I miss the heat of India, the food, the houselizards on the walls,

the musicals on the silver screen, the cowswandering the streets, the crows

cawing, even the talk ofcricket matches, but I love Canada. It is a great country

 

muchtoo cold for good sense, inhabited by compassionate, intelligentpeople

with bad hairdos. Anyway, I have nothing to go hometo in Pondicherry.
Richard Parker has stayed with me. I’ve never forgotten him.

Dare I say I miss him? I do. I miss him. I still see him in mydreams. They are

nightmares mostly, but nightmares tinged withlove. Such is the strangeness

of the human heart. I still cannotunderstand how he could abandon me so

 

unceremoniously,without any sort of goodbye, without looking back even once.
That pain is like an axe that chops at my heart.shlf1314

The doctors and nurses at the hospital in Mexico wereincredibly kind to me. And

the patients, too. Victims of canceror car accidents, once they heard my story, they

hobbled andwheeled over to see me, they and their families, though noneof them

 

spoke English and I spoke no Spanish. They smiled atme, shook my hand, patted

me on the head, left gifts of foodand clothing on my bed. They moved

me to uncontrollable fitsof laughing and crying.shlf1314

 

“I hear the motor, my dear,” Mrs. Langwell interrupted. “You’d better hurry.”

13 “He’s early this morning, but probably he has something to do before schedule.”

The girl hastened with her own preparations so that when the young man

 

appeared at the door she was properly helmeted and all ready to take the air.

“Top of the morning to you,” Phil called cheerily. “Your esteemed passenger wants

to make an early start, so the boys will have Nike warmed up for you and

 

you can start as soon as you get to the field.”shlf1314

“It’s mighty good of you to come and fetch me,” Roberta smiled at the president’s

son, who had not so many weeks before gone through a series of exciting,

 

dangerous air-adventures with her. But those things shlf1314

 

were all in the day’s

work and belonged

to the past; the new

day awaited them.

www.shlfbbb.com

“You are not so fed up on Mrs. Pollzoff that you want to

“You are not so fed up on Mrs. Pollzoff that you want to

“You are not so fed up on Mrs. Pollzoff that you want to

get away from us all, are you?” he demanded.

“No, of course not, but I was wondering what his plan was

and what happened to it, if anything,” Roberta answered.

 

“Glad to hear you do not want to leave. Gosh, to lose our only

girl sky-pilot would be—unthinkable; but, come to think of it, Howe

came to the house to see Dad one day last week, perhaps they are

getting it fixed up for you to take on the job. I heard the Old Man

 

say the Federal representative would be at the office today, so

perhaps you’ll get some information. Here we are.” They reached

the plane and Roberta climbed into the seat beside the pilot’s,

 

adjusted straps and parachute, while the young man gave his

machine15 a thorough looking-over then took his own place.

 

I still smart a little at the slight. When you’ve suffered agreat deal in

life, each additional pain is both unbearable andtrifling. My life is like

 

a memento mori painting from Europeanart: there is always a grinning

skull at my side to remind meof the folly of human ambition. I mock

this skull. I look at itand I say, “You’ve got the wrong fellow. You may

not believein life, but I don’t believe in death. Move on!”

 

The skullsnickers and moves ever closer, but that doesn’t surprise me.
The reason death sticks so closely to life isn’t biologicalnecessity – it’s envy.

Life is so beautiful that death has fallen inlove with it, a jealous,

 

possessive love that grabs at what it can.
But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two ofno importance,

and gloom is but the passing shadow of acloud. The pink boy also got the

nod from the RhodesScholarship committee. I love him and I hope his time

 

atOxford was a rich experience. If Lakshmi, goddess of

wealth,one day favours me bountifully, Oxford is

 

fifth on the list

ofcities I would like

to visit before

I pass on, after

shlfaaa.com

“Top of the morning to you,” Phil called cheerily. “Your

“Top of the morning to you,” Phil called cheerily. “Your

“Top of the morning to you,” Phil called cheerily. “Your esteemed passenger

wants to make an early start, so the boys will have Nike warmed up for

you and you can start as soon as you get to the field.”

 

“It’s mighty good of you to come and fetch me,” Roberta smiled at the

president’s son, who had not so many weeks before gone through a series

of exciting, dangerous air-adventures with her. But those things were all in

the day’s work and belonged to the past; the new day awaited them.

 

“It isn’t much of a hop, and as Mrs. Pollzoff has all the earmarks of being a

good customer, she must be humored,” Phil grinned. “Just the same, I’m

glad they wished her on you and Nike instead of the Moth and yours truly.”

 

“Well, it’s no particular fun piloting her. I wish she’d decide she wants variety,

and14 give you all a chance at the job,” Roberta told him. They were making

their way to where the Moth, Phil’s own imported machine, waited to leap in

 

the air with them. “I say, when is Mr. Howe going to start that investigation

he spoke of a few weeks ago. Heard anything about it?”

 

I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists area friendly, atheistic,

hard-working, beer-drinking lot whose mindsare preoccupied with sex, chess

and baseball when they arenot preoccupied with science.

I was a very good student, if I may say so myself. I wastops at St. Michael’s

College four years in a row. I got everypossible student award from the

 

Department of Zoology. If Igot none from the Department of Religious Studies,

it is simplybecause there are no student awards in this department (therewards

of religious study are not in mortal hands, we allknow that). I would have

 

received the Governor General’sAcademic Medal, the University of Toronto’s

highestundergraduate award, of which no small number of illustriousCanadians

have been recipients, were it not for a beef-eatingpink boy with a neck like a

 

tree trunk and a

temperament

ofunbearable

good cheer.

www.shlfaaa.com

It seemed natural that Mr. Patel’s story should be toldmostly

It seemed natural that Mr. Patel’s story should be toldmostly

It seemed natural that Mr. Patel’s story should be toldmostly in the

first person – in his voice and through hiseyes. But

any inaccuracies or mistakes are mine.

I have a few people to thank. I am most obviouslyindebted to Mr.

Patel. My gratitude to him is as boundlessas the Pacific Ocean and I

hope that my telling of his taledoes not disappoint him. For getting

 

me started on thestory, I have Mr. Adirubasamy to thank. For helping

mecomplete it, I am grateful to three officials of exemplaryprofessionalism:

Mr. Kazuhiko Oda, lately of the JapaneseEmbassy in Ottawa; Mr. Hiroshi

 

Watanabe, of OikaShipping Company; and, especially, Mr. Tomohiro

Okamoto,of the Japanese Ministry of Transport, now retired. As forthe

 

spark of life, I owe it to Mr. Moacyr Scliar. Lastly, Iwould like to express

my sincere gratitude to that greatinstitution, the Canada Council for the

Arts, without whosegrant I could not have brought together this story

 

that hasnothing to do with Portugal in 1939. If we, citizens, do notsupport

our artists, then we sacrifice our imagination onthe altar of crude reality

and we end up believing innothing and having worthless dreams.

 

One of Jobs’s great strengths was knowing how to focus. “Deciding what

not to do is as important as deciding what to do,” he said. “That’s true

for companies, and it’s true for products.”

 

He went to work applying this principle as soon as he returned to Apple.

One day he was walking the halls and ran into a young Wharton School

graduate who had been Amelio’s assistant and who said he was wrapping

 

up his work. “Well, good, because I need someone to do grunt work,” Jobs

told him. His new role was to take notes as Jobs met with the dozens of

product teams at Apple, asked them to explain what they were doing,

 

and forced them

to justify going

ahead with their

products or projects.

www.shlfbb.com

You must askhim all the questions you want.”Later, in Toronto

You must askhim all the questions you want.”Later, in Toronto

You must askhim all the questions you want.”Later, in Toronto, among

nine columns of Patels in thephone book, I found him, the main character.

My heartpounded as I dialed his phone number. The voice thatanswered

 

had an Indian lilt to its Canadian accent, lightbut unmistakable, like a trace

of incense in the air. “Thatwas a very long time ago,” he said.

Yet he agreed to meet.

We met many times. He showed me the diary he keptduring the events.

He showed me the yellowed newspaperclippings that made him briefly,

obscurely famous. He toldme his story. All the while I took notes. Nearly a

 

yearlater, after considerable difficulties, I received a tape and areport from

the Japanese Ministry of Transport. It was as Ilistened to that tape that

I agreed with Mr. Adirubasamythat this was, indeed, a story to make you believe in God.

 

Jobs disagreed. He telephoned Ed Woolard to say he was getting Apple out

of the licensing business. The board acquiesced, and in September he reached

 

a deal to pay Power Computing $100 million to relinquish its license and give

Apple access to its database of customers. He soon terminated the licenses of

 

the other cloners as well. “It was the dumbest thing in the world to let

companies making crappier hardware use our operating system and cut

 

into our sales,”

he later said.

Product

Line Review

shlfcc.com

God?””Yes.””That’s a tall order.””Not so tall that you can’t reach.”

God?””Yes.””That’s a tall order.””Not so tall that you can’t reach.”

God?””Yes.””That’s a tall order.””Not so tall that you can’t reach.”My waiter appeared.

I hesitated for a moment. I orderedtwo coffees. We introduced ourselves.

His name was FrancisAdirubasamy. “Please tell me your story,” I said.

“You must pay proper attention,” he replied.
“I will.” I brought out pen and notepad.
“Tell me, have you been to the botanical garden?” heasked.

“I went yesterday.””Didyou notice the toy train tracks?””Yes, I did.””A train

still runs on Sundays for the amusement of thechildren. But it used to run

twice an hour every day. Didyou take note of the names of the stations?””One

 

is called Roseville. It’s right next to the rosegarden.””That’s right. And the

other?””I don’t remember.””The sign was taken down. The other station was

oncecalled Zootown. The toy train had two stops: Roseville andZootown.

 

Once upon a time there was a zoo in thePondicherry Botanical Garden.”He

went on. I took notes, the elements of the story. “Youmust talk to him,”

he said, of the main character. “I knewhim very, very well. He’s a grown man now.

 

So upon his return to Apple he made killing the Macintosh clones a priority.

When a new version of the Mac operating system shipped in July 1997,

weeks after he had helped oust Amelio, Jobs did not allow the clone makers

 

to upgrade to it. The head of Power Computing, Stephen “King” Kahng,

organized pro-cloning protests when Jobs appeared at Boston Macworld that

August and publicly warned that the Macintosh OS would die if Jobs declined

to keep licensing it out. “If the platform goes closed, it is over,”

 

Kahng said. “

Total destruction.

Closed is the

kiss of death.”

www.shlfcc.com

One of his motivating passions was to build a lasting company

One of his motivating passions was to build a lasting company

One of his motivating passions was to build a lasting company. At age twelve,

when he got a summer job at Hewlett-Packard, he learned that a properly run

company could spawn innovation far more than any single creative individual.

“I discovered that the best innovation is sometimes the company, the way you

 

organize a company,” he recalled. “The whole notion of how you build a company

is fascinating. When I got the chance to come back to Apple, I realized that

I would be useless without the company, and that’s why I decided to stay and rebuild it.”

Killing the Clones

 

One of the great debates about Apple was whether it should have licensed its

operating system more aggressively to other computer makers, the way Microsoft

licensed Windows. Wozniak had favored that approach from the beginning.

 

“We had the most beautiful operating system,” he said, “but to get it you had

to buy our hardware at twice the price. That was a mistake. What we should

have done was calculate an appropriate price to license the operating system.”

 

Alan Kay, the star of Xerox PARC who came to Apple as a fellow in 1984, also

fought hard for licensing the Mac OS software. “Software people are always

multiplatform, because you want to run on everything,” he recalled. “And

that was a huge battle, probably the largest battle I lost at Apple.”

 

After my writing day was over, I would go for walks inthe rolling hills of the tea estates.
Unfortunately, the novel sputtered, coughed and died. Ithappened in Matheran,

not far from Bombay, a small hillstation with some monkeys but no tea estates.

It’s a miserypeculiar to would-be writers. Your theme is good, as areyour sentences.

 

Your characters are so ruddy with life theypractically need birth certificates. The plot

you’ve mappedout for them is grand, simple and gripping. You’ve doneyour research,

gathering the facts – historical, social,climatic, culinary – that will give your story its

 

feel ofauthenticity.

The dialogue zips

along, crackling

with tension.

shlfdd.com

“They speak a funny Englishin India. They like words like

“They speak a funny Englishin India. They like words like

“They speak a funny Englishin India. They like words like bamboozle.” I remembered

hiswords as my plane started its descent towards Delhi, so theword bamboozle was

my one preparation for the rich, noisy,functioning madness of India. I used the

 

word on occasion,and truth be told, it served me well. To a clerk at a trainstation I said,

“I didn’t think the fare would be soexpensive. You’re, not trying to bamboozle me, are

you?” Hesmiled and chanted, “No sir! There is no bamboozlementhere. I have quoted

 

you the correct fare.”This second time to India I knew better what to expectand I knew

what I wanted: I would settle in a hill stationand write my novel. I had visions of myself

sitting at atable on a large veranda, my notes spread out in front ofme next to a

 

steaming cup of tea. Green hills heavy withmists would lie at my feet and the shrill

cries of monkeyswould fill my ears. The weather would be just right,requiring a light

sweater mornings and evenings, andsomething short-sleeved midday. Thus set up,

 

pen in hand,for the sake of greater truth, I would turn Portugal into afiction. That’s

what fiction is about, isn’t it, the selectivetransforming of reality? The twisting of it

to bring out itsessence? What need did I have to go to Portugal?

The lady who ran the place would tell me stories aboutthe struggle to boot the

British out. We would agree onwhat I was to have for lunch and supper the next day.

 

Despite the grueling schedule, the more that Jobs immersed himself in Apple, the more

he realized that he would not be able to walk away. When Michael Dell was asked at a

computer trade show in October 1997 what he would do if he were Steve Jobs and

 

taking over Apple, he replied, “I’d shut it down and give the money back to the

shareholders.” Jobs fired off an email to Dell. “CEOs are supposed to have class,”

it said. “I can see that isn’t an opinion you hold.” Jobs liked to stoke up rivalries as

 

a way to rally his team—he had done so with IBM and Microsoft—and he did so

with Dell. When he called together his managers to institute a build-to-order

system for manufacturing and distribution, Jobs used as a backdrop a blown-up

picture of Michael Dell with a target on his face.

 

“We’re coming after

you, buddy,”

he said to cheers

from his troops.

www.shlfdd.com